7 Inexpensive Garage Upgrades That Make a Big Difference

blue car parked beside red garage door

Your garage can be much more than just a place to park your car or store the odd box or two: With a few simple and inexpensive upgrades, you can transform your garage into a versatile storage space, improve your curb appeal, and even increase your home’s value.

Read on to discover seven easy and inexpensive ways you can upgrade your garage and make greater use of this valuable space.

1. Garage Storage System

Though they may be built for storing cars, garages can be great places to store just about everything else—especially heavier items that would be difficult to carry between the basement or a storage unit. From crates to lawnmowers, your garage can probably store more than you think!

However, your square footage is still valuable. As a result, investing in a good garage storage system can help you make the most of your garage space while also organizing your belongings more efficiently. Common garage storage solutions include wall shelving, rolling storage carts, and even ceiling racks for storing items overhead—a vastly underutilized space.

2. Insulation

While insulating your garage might seem like overkill, it comes with more benefits than many people would realize: In addition to keeping your car and any stored belongings at a consistent temperature, garage insulation can also improve your home’s energy efficiency and reduce drafts.

Garage insulation is especially important for those living in colder climates, where extreme cold can often cause damage to car fuel tanks and electrical systems—plus, nobody wants to get into an ice-cold car.

3. Electrical Outlets

Electrical outlets are a must if you want to transform your garage into a more versatile multipurpose space. Thankfully, it’s a relatively inexpensive upgrade and a simple job for any certified electrician.

Adding a few electrical outlets around the garage allows you to use power tools, set up a workshop, or plug in a vacuum and other equipment for cleaning your car. A garage electrical outlet can also allow you to install extra appliances, such as an extra freezer or refrigerator.

4. Fixing the Concrete Floor

Concrete is bound to crack and crumble eventually—especially if a car drives over it every day! If your concrete floor has seen better days, then fixing cracks and pitted areas may be essential for protecting it from further damage.

Fixing minor concrete damage is often inexpensive and can be done without having to replace or re-pour the entire floor. After repairs, consider garage waterproofing to help further protect your investment.

5. Upgraded Garage Doors

Upgrading your garage doors is a quick and extremely effective way to improve your curb appeal—and it’s often less expensive than many people assume. Even at times when upgrading your garage doors becomes costly, however, the resulting increase in home value is almost always higher than the initial investment.

6. DIY Parking Guide

Never quite sure how much room you have when pulling into your garage? Look no further than a parking guide—a simple DIY hack you can do in less than an hour using materials you probably already have.

While there are many ways to build a parking guide, the simplest involves hanging a tennis ball from a string attached to the ceiling of your garage. The tennis ball should drop down far enough so that it “taps” your car once it reaches the ideal distance from the wall.

7. Garage Waterproofing

moss on the cement wall

Garage waterproofing is the quickest and most effective way to protect both your garage floor and your home from water damage. A waterproof garage floor is especially necessary for areas that receive high amounts of annual rainfall, as water infiltration can cause severe damage to concrete floors over time.

For more information on our garage waterproofing services, call our team of waterproofing professionals at (424) 339-0953.

Updating Your Garage? Here Are Some Helpful Things to Keep in Mind

big luxury house with front yard and garage

Whether you’re updating your garage or building a new one altogether, there’s a lot to consider: From size and materials to local weather and zoning requirements, designing a garage takes much more than simply deciding on the number of doors!

Considering the following points will not only help you design a better garage but will also help streamline the design and construction processes—and help avoid future setbacks and mistakes.

How Will You Be Using Your Garage?

How you plan to use your garage will likely be the biggest factor in your design. Common considerations include how many cars you have––or at least how many you’d like to keep in the garage––and other vehicles you plan to store, such as boats, off-road vehicles, and golf carts.

Of course, the garage isn’t just for storing vehicles: Many people also choose to have workshops, garage storage, and even living and recreation areas inside their garage. These considerations will help you decide not only how many garage doors to include in your design but also how much extra space you’ll need for extra equipment or living and work areas.

Zoning, Code, and HOA Restrictions

No matter how thoughtful or well-planned your design may be, it will ultimately be limited by your local zoning, code, or homeowner’s association (HOA) restrictions. While often annoying, these restrictions are in place for a good reason—and the fines and headaches for violating them aren’t worth your trouble.

As a result, be sure to verify your design with local zoning, code, HOA, or any other authority well before construction—or even before starting your design, for that matter. An architect or construction service can also help you ensure that your design falls within local guidelines.

Size

While the size of your garage is largely determined by how you plan to use it––number of cars, recreation space, etc.––you should also consider the size of your vehicles, how much extra space you need, and the size of the garage relative to your house and other structures. For example, if you live in a suburban area, there’s no sense in building a garage large enough to fit an excavator!

If you plan to have extra living or work areas inside your garage, be sure to factor your space needs into the floor plan—especially if they’ll be sharing the same floor as cars and other vehicles.

Location––Attached vs. Unattached

The location of your garage will also put some restrictions on your design; ultimately, your garage will either be attached or unattached. While an unattached garage provides the most freedom in design, it’s also the most difficult to “blend” with the design of an existing house or other structures.

Whether attached or unattached, the location of your garage also depends on the orientation of your driveway. Make sure that your garage’s location provides you with the most space for backing in or out.

Style and Materials

While the style and materials of your garage should usually match those of the house, this isn’t always the case—and, in some cases, the intended use and location of your garage may dictate otherwise. In any case, make sure that the style and materials of your garage not only match the use but also the style of your home and, where necessary, HOA design restrictions.

Garage Waterproofing and Surface Preparation

wet garage floor

Though it may be an indoor space, your garage gets plenty of outdoor abuse: Whether it’s dirt, mud, rain, or snow, it’s crucial to protect your garage’s surfaces with basic treatments such as a waterproof garage floor covering. Thankfully, garage waterproofing is affordable and easy with the right professionals.

For more information on our garage waterproofing services, call our Los Angeles team of waterproofing experts at (424) 339-0953.